American Diabetes Association
Browse
Online-OnlySupplementalMaterial_rev2.pdf (1011.77 kB)

Plant-based dietary patterns and incident diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

Download (1011.77 kB)
figure
posted on 2024-02-13, 17:49 authored by Valerie K Sullivan, Hyunju KimHyunju Kim, Laura E. Caulfield, Lyn M Steffen, Elizabeth Selvin, Casey M. Rebholz

Objective: Plant-based dietary patterns emphasize plant foods and minimize animal-derived foods. We investigated the association between plant-based dietary patterns and diabetes in a community-based U.S. sample of Black and White adults. Research Design and Methods: We included middle-aged adults from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study without diabetes at baseline who completed a food frequency questionnaire (n=11,965). We scored plant-based diet adherence according to three indices: overall, healthy, and unhealthy plant-based diet indices. Higher overall plant-based diet index scores represent greater intakes of all plant foods and lower intakes of animal-derived foods. Higher healthy plant-based diet index scores represent greater healthy plant food intake and lower intakes of animal-derived and unhealthy plant foods. Higher unhealthy plant-based diet index scores represent greater unhealthy plant food intake and lower intakes of animal-derived and healthy plant foods. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios for incident diabetes (defined by self-reported diagnosis, medication use, or elevated blood glucose) associated with each index. Results: Over a median follow-up of 22 years, we identified 4,208 diabetes cases. Higher overall plant-based diet index scores were associated with a lower risk of diabetes (quintile 5 versus 1: HR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80, 0.98; P-trend=0.01). Healthy plant-based diet index scores were also inversely associated with diabetes risk (quintile 5 versus 1: HR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.77, 0.94; P-trend<0.001). Unhealthy plant-based diet index scores were not associated with diabetes risk. Conclusions: A dietary pattern that minimizes animal-derived foods and emphasizes plant foods may reduce diabetes risk.

Funding

The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract nos. (75N92022D00001, 75N92022D00002, 75N92022D00003, 75N92022D00004, 75N92022D00005). The authors thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions. CMR was supported by a grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01 HL153178). VKS was supported by NIH/NHLBI T32 HL007024. HK was supported by a grant from the NHLBI (K01 HL168232). ES was supported by NIH/NHLBI grant K24 HL152440.

History

Usage metrics

    Diabetes Care

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC